Why I Want Mateo To Have A Personalized Voice Of His Own

There are new technologies out there that could help Mateo speak with a voice that is unlike any other.  Blending his own natural voice with a donor voice, like his dad’s, VocalID would create a voice of his very own.  We’ve been talking with him about it.  We want him to make the decision to do it or not.  It’s his voice.  If we decided to pursue it, it would be something he’d use for many, many years. Right now, its price tag is $1000. He’s worrying whether or not that’s too expensive.  I think that’s a pretty cool attitude for a 16-year old.

Speech communicating devices come with a limited number of standard voices. His Dynavox has a total of 37 voice options. This includes male/female, child/adult and a few voices with various accents.  Some of them sound so robotic, they were not even in the running for consideration. In addition to these voices being used in AAC devices, they are also used in voice prompts at ATMs and on automated telephone voice response systems.

Here’s why I think Mateo should choose to have a voice made for him.  This voice would be like no other.  He could contribute quite a bit of his natural voice which would be blended with a donor voice.  His dad is concerned that he doesn’t want Mateo’s voice to sound too much like his voice because he wants Mateo’s voice to be his own. I pointed out that our daughter’s voice sounds a great deal like mine. Mateo’s personalized voice would contain his own pitch, tone, rhythm and loudness.  He could use this customized voice for many years to come on his Dynavox, if he continues to use it, or on an iPad with his same core vocabulary — Wordpower. He’s been struggling emotionally so much lately with a desire to communicate naturally as opposed to using technology.  Don’t get me wrong.  Mateo is a happy guy, but he just wants to speak.  He just wants something to come easily to him. For the most part, I can’t help him with any of this.  This personalized voice would be something that includes a part of him.

In addition to worries about the hefty price tag, we think Mateo is less concerned about having the same voice as many AAC users out there.  He’s the only one in our community who communicates in this way.  His voice is the only one that stands out in a crowded restaurant or at a school assembly.  Here, in our wonderful community, he’s immediately recognized when his voice is heard. The only time he’s surrounded by voices like his own at Camp ALEC, for example, when there are 19 other AAC communicators together for one glorious week.  If Mateo went to a school with other AAC users , he might feel a greater need to differentiate his voice from those of his peers.

We will be making a decision on this in the next week or so while we can still pre-order his voice at this cost.

This technology will help many, many individuals to speak with voices of their own.  It’s not simply about the personalization of a voice.  It’s about improving these voices so that they sound as natural as possible.  Please take a moment to look at VocalID.  Watch the story of how our friend Maeve obtained her voice.  Please consider making a donation to support this research and technology to give voices to individuals who cannot speak.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/vocalid-custom-crafted-voices#/story

VocalID image

Fringe Makes Me Cringe

Happy Better Speech and Hearing Month. It’s finally May and I’ve been reflecting on what this career has meant to me personally. To those SLPs who have worked with Mateo and helped him accomplish amazing things, I thank you.  To those SLPs who encouraged me to embrace this incredible career and continue to inspire me every day, I thank you.  And to those families who allow me to work with their children, I thank you. I am deeply touched that you trust me and let me be a part of their story.

So, I took a journey into the past again recently–when Mateo was very young and I was a mom still learning about AAC. Back then, I spent hours and hours programming weekly vocabulary and spelling words on his device. For every science unit, I made sure there was a page that contained words like cumulonimbus.  It wasn’t until much later that I realized that back then I didn’t view his Dynavox as a means for him to communicate anything he wanted across his life time.  I did not program his device in such a way that he could achieve spontaneous novel utterance generation (or SNUG). Instead, we were primarily focused on whether he could simply respond like everyone else in the classroom.  Once that unit was done, we often wiped out that vocabulary list to make room for the next one.  We thought we were leveling the playing field by giving Mateo access to the same words as all the speaking children.  Looking back, maybe we were in denial and hoping this was something temporary.

Now I cringe at the mere thought of fringe vocabulary. It makes me absolutely crazy.

AAC devices must be built around core vocabulary, words that we all use all the time every day. We want communicators to create spontaneous novel utterances and they can do that if they have access to these core words. Core vocabularies consist of words identified as being important for an individual to express anything they want to say across activities,  environments and communication partners.   With a few hundred words, a person can say over 80% of what is needed.

We use just 50 words 40-50% of the time
We use just 100 words 60% of the time
We use just 200 words 70% of the time
We use just 400 words 80% of the time

For school-aged children, there is a temptation to customize communication devices and apps like crazy, often with an emphasis on vocabulary that is introduced in the classroom.  The device is then used as a means of assessing a child’s acquisition of these concepts. Children can be given access to fringe and academic vocabulary using a word bank or word wall, if needed.  Better yet, we can model language in the classroom to help children build on their core language communication while still demonstrating their understanding of academic concepts.  It means changing our mindset as communication partners.  As a result, the child will gain more practice in using their core vocabulary and become a more competent communicator.

Let’s contrast two science discussions:

Scenario 1
Teacher to AAC learner: Name the biological process that results in a caterpillar changing into a butterfly.
AAC learner: Metamorphosis (using pre-stored fringe vocabulary)

Scenario 2
Teacher to AAC learner: Tell me about metamorphosis.
AAC learner: Caterpillar change and turn to butterfly (using all core words)

As parents and professionals, we must give children words they can use to communicate anything they want to say every day.  A parent asked me this week, “Do you think he will gain enough speech to be able to express his needs?”  This child is three years old and we’re introducing AAC.  My response: “Maybe, but whether or not that’s the case, that’s not enough for me.  I want more for him. I want him to tell me anything he wants to say.”