Fringe Makes Me Cringe

Happy Better Speech and Hearing Month. It’s finally May and I’ve been reflecting on what this career has meant to me personally. To those SLPs who have worked with Mateo and helped him accomplish amazing things, I thank you.  To those SLPs who encouraged me to embrace this incredible career and continue to inspire me every day, I thank you.  And to those families who allow me to work with their children, I thank you. I am deeply touched that you trust me and let me be a part of their story.

So, I took a journey into the past again recently–when Mateo was very young and I was a mom still learning about AAC. Back then, I spent hours and hours programming weekly vocabulary and spelling words on his device. For every science unit, I made sure there was a page that contained words like cumulonimbus.  It wasn’t until much later that I realized that back then I didn’t view his Dynavox as a means for him to communicate anything he wanted across his life time.  I did not program his device in such a way that he could achieve spontaneous novel utterance generation (or SNUG). Instead, we were primarily focused on whether he could simply respond like everyone else in the classroom.  Once that unit was done, we often wiped out that vocabulary list to make room for the next one.  We thought we were leveling the playing field by giving Mateo access to the same words as all the speaking children.  Looking back, maybe we were in denial and hoping this was something temporary.

Now I cringe at the mere thought of fringe vocabulary. It makes me absolutely crazy.

AAC devices must be built around core vocabulary, words that we all use all the time every day. We want communicators to create spontaneous novel utterances and they can do that if they have access to these core words. Core vocabularies consist of words identified as being important for an individual to express anything they want to say across activities,  environments and communication partners.   With a few hundred words, a person can say over 80% of what is needed.

We use just 50 words 40-50% of the time
We use just 100 words 60% of the time
We use just 200 words 70% of the time
We use just 400 words 80% of the time

For school-aged children, there is a temptation to customize communication devices and apps like crazy, often with an emphasis on vocabulary that is introduced in the classroom.  The device is then used as a means of assessing a child’s acquisition of these concepts. Children can be given access to fringe and academic vocabulary using a word bank or word wall, if needed.  Better yet, we can model language in the classroom to help children build on their core language communication while still demonstrating their understanding of academic concepts.  It means changing our mindset as communication partners.  As a result, the child will gain more practice in using their core vocabulary and become a more competent communicator.

Let’s contrast two science discussions:

Scenario 1
Teacher to AAC learner: Name the biological process that results in a caterpillar changing into a butterfly.
AAC learner: Metamorphosis (using pre-stored fringe vocabulary)

Scenario 2
Teacher to AAC learner: Tell me about metamorphosis.
AAC learner: Caterpillar change and turn to butterfly (using all core words)

As parents and professionals, we must give children words they can use to communicate anything they want to say every day.  A parent asked me this week, “Do you think he will gain enough speech to be able to express his needs?”  This child is three years old and we’re introducing AAC.  My response: “Maybe, but whether or not that’s the case, that’s not enough for me.  I want more for him. I want him to tell me anything he wants to say.” 

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One thought on “Fringe Makes Me Cringe

  1. Great points! I see many students who come up with PECS books and devices full of words that were used very briefly as they moved through junior high. I have been working with our SLP to transition students to using a core vocabulary set with much success!

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