AAC Awareness Month and Talking to Strangers

Fall is my favorite time of the year.  October is special to all of us because it is AAC Awareness Month and we love to tell people how proud we are of Mateo. Today, his speech-generating device enables him to say exactly what he wants to say to anyone in any environment.  But he’s had to work very hard to be a competent communicator.

When Mateo obtained his first device at the age of 4, we were sure he was the only one who spoke like he did.  Mateo felt alone.  We felt alone.  But over the years, largely because Mateo attended Camp Chatterbox for AAC users, we found a family.  We grew to know and love children and young adults who communicate like Mateo.  Mateo was introduced to mentors who helped him become more confident with his voice.  I wish every child had a mentor.  As a SLP, I encourage my families to network and to reach out to other families traveling this AAC journey.  It’s easy to feel isolated when your voice is so different.

Now 17 years old, Mateo is a confident communicator.  Because he’s able to say anything that’s on his mind, he’s also able to be more independent and on his own in the community.   He’s outgoing and extremely curious. He has no issues striking up conversations with strangers.  My husband and I are both introverts by nature.  Mateo reminds me of my father and big brothers — always anxious to meet someone new, make a friend and tell a story.  As a small child, we certainly cautioned him about talking to strangers, especially when he was still struggling to communicate.  Now, we encourage him to make connections on his own.  It’s still a little scary for me, but I’m so very proud to watch him do this over and over again.  Sometimes, he initiates the conversations and, on other occasions, strangers approach him because they’re curious about how he’s talking or because they have a family member or friend who uses a similar voice.

At Disneyworld, Mateo approached a teen who was waiting in line with his family directly behind us.  A Cavs fan, Mateo couldn’t help but comment on the teen’s Golden State Warriors shirt given his beloved Cavs had just won the championship in a tough matchup against Golden State in the finals.  I watched as the young man responded to Mateo’s initiation of the conversation.  For a brief moment, he seemed surprised and maybe even a little bit uncomfortable.  He recovered quickly and responded with enthusiasm, respect and genuine interest. They had a great conversation about their teams!

In a hospital waiting room, Mateo asked a family sitting beside him where they were from.  He told them about his home town and, before he left, he wished them a healthy day.

But it’s not just Mateo kicking off conversations.  Often, strangers observe us talking in a restaurant or a store and approach HIM.  This weekend, an elderly man walked up to him and introduced himself. This stranger explained that a parishioner at his church recently obtained a similar AAC device and how it’s been life changing.  They ended up discussing their rival high school football teams.  On many occasions, Mateo is approached by strangers who tell him, “My son uses a thing like that!” or “My cousin talks with a computer too.” I think that people are drawn to Mateo because they want to know they’re not alone. 

There IS more awareness of AAC.  Mateo is working to win over new listeners and make people comfortable with his voice every day. I asked him recently what makes a good listener.  Here are some of the things he said:

  • Wait while I create my message
  • Look at me while I’m talking
  • Remember that I’m doing the talking, not my computer
  • If you don’t understand what I’m saying, don’t pretend that you do (I can tell when you fake it)
  • Ask me questions and I’ll tell you more
  • Just LISTEN!

Mateo recently told us he wants to talk to children about his voice.  He’s working to flush out what he wants his message to be and we’ll try to help him achieve this dream.  It’s who we are.  We are an AAC family.

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